Judaean pillar-figurines and the archaeology of Asherah

by Raz Kletter

Publisher: Tempus Reparatum in Oxford

Written in English
Published: Pages: 292 Downloads: 151
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Edition Notes

StatementRaz Kletter.
SeriesBAR -- 636
The Physical Object
Pagination292p. ;
Number of Pages292
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22642400M
ISBN 10086054818X

Among his publications The Judean Pillar Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah (), Economic Keystones. The Weight System of the Kingdom of Judah (), Yavneh I-II. The Excavation of the “Temple Hill” Repository Pit and the Cult Stands (with Irit Ziffer and Wolfgang Zwickel, , ), and most recently, Archaeology, Heritage and. Asherah was very present in Israelite religion but her appearances in the Hebrew Bible are weird for lack of a better term. She usually seems to be represented as a tree or a pole. In the archaeological record there are a multitude of goddess figurines, specifically from domestic sites, which likely represent her. The Judean Pillar-Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah. BAR International Series ; Oxford: British Archaeological Reports. [Google Scholar] Meyers, Carol. Discovering Eve: Ancient Israelite Women in Context. New York and Oxford: Oxford University. [Google Scholar] Meyers, Carol. Author: Beth Alpert Nakhai. As the shovels of archaeology resurrect what the pens of history forgot, Asherah’s forgotten history is resurfacing from the sands of time. Asherah’s lost story is reconstructed through archaeology’s discovery of artifacts with images of Asherah and several Asherah inscriptions.

As part of his conclusion, Raz Kletter, an Israeli archaeologist, wrote in his monograph entitled "Judean Pillar Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah" (BAR `) that. It is important to stress that the identification of the JPFs [Judean Pillar Figurines] with Asherah seems very probable, but is not proven and should not be taken for granted. So the text draws a contrast between the reality of ancient Israeli religion at its very beginnings, which was polytheistic, with how the Bible asserts it had always existed as monotheism or at best henotheism, and that assertions of an ideal monotheism were actually a very late development of the Judean monarchy prior to the Babylonian /5. Yahweh was the national god of the kingdoms of Israel (Samaria) and Judah. His origins reach at least to the early Iron Age and apparently to the Late Bronze, and in the oldest biblical literature he is a storm-and-warrior deity who leads the heavenly army against Israel's enemies. At that time the Israelites worshipped Yahweh alongside a variety of Canaanite gods and goddesses, including El. Did God Have a Wife? shines new light on the presence and influence of women's cults in early Israel and their implications for our understanding of Israel's official "Book religion." Dever pays particular attention to the goddess Asherah, reviled by the authors of the Hebrew Bible as a foreign deity but, in the view of many modern scholars /5(43).

This new examination of the region of Nebuchadrezzar II of Babylon ( BC) includes revised interpretations of the Babylonian Chronicles for his reign, especially for the years of the campaigns against the West and the capture of Jerusalem. Excavations at Babylon are used to give a view of the city in Neo-Babylonian times, including the royal `Hanging Gardens' and the ziggurat.

Judaean pillar-figurines and the archaeology of Asherah by Raz Kletter Download PDF EPUB FB2

Journal of Field Archaeology Negahban, E. The Seals of Marlik Tepe. Journal of Near Eastern Studies Weapons from Marlik. Archiologische Mittei-lungen aus Iran, Erginzungsband Berlin: Reimer. The Judean Pillar-Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah, by Raz Kletter.

BAR International Series texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK The Judean Pillar-Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah Item Preview remove-circle The Judean Pillar-Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah by Raz Kletter (Author) Publication date   Judaean Pillar-Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah by Raz Kletter,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(3).

In “JPFs: More Questions than Answers” in the September/October issue of Biblical Archaeology Review, Robert Deutsch provides an overview of these puzzling pillar figurines. To begin, the name “Judean pillar figurine”—as these objects are universally called—is somewhat of a misnomer. The land in which these pillar figurines were found was called Judah, not Judea.

The Judean pillar-figurines and the archaeology of Asherah. Post a Comment. CONTRIBUTORS: Author: Kletter, Raz. PUBLISHER: Tempus Reparatum (Oxford, England). SERIES. The Judean Pillar Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah [Figures & Bibli].

Judean pillar-figurines and the archaeology of Asherah. Oxford, England: Tempus Reparatum, (OCoLC) Named Person: Thomas Andrew Holland; Ashtart, (divinité sémitique) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Raz Kletter. The Judean Pillar Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah [Chaps.

The Judean Pillar Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah [Chapters ]. By: Biblical Archaeology Society Staff “Yahweh and his Asherah” is written across the top of this eighth-century B.C. drawing on a ceramic pithos from Kuntillet ‘Ajrud in the eastern Sinai.

Some scholars have theorized that these figures resembling the Egyptian god Bes are in. Pottery Figurine, Judah, Iron Age II, 8th-6th century BCE clay, Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Judean or Judahite pillar figurines (JPF's) are common Judaean pillar-figurines and the archaeology of Asherah book Judah during the First Temple period (ca.

– BCE).Thousands of these household objects have been found but do not seem to be present in Judah following the Babylonian conquest in BCE. JPFs are clay female figurines with heads rendered. Archaeology and Folk religion in Ancient Israel (Eerdmans, ), and Raz Kletter, The Judean Pillar-Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah (Oxford, ).

[4] Some scholars try to strengthen this association by pointing out that the Egyptian goddess, Qudshu, is associated with Asherah, and the JPF’s characteristic hair style is like that of Qudshu.

Thoughts on the Judean Pillar Figurine Over 3, fired clay pillar figurines in female form with pinched or molded heads, bare breasts supported by arms, and a pillar-like lower body, have been found in archeological contexts in Israel, mostly from the southern kingdom of Judah, and mostly from the 8th and 7th centuries BCE.

Judean pillar figurines are one of the most common ritual objects from Iron II Israel. These small terracotta females have received a great deal of scholarly attention, appearing in discussions about Israelite religion, monotheism, and women's practice. Yet the figurines are still poorly understood.

Modern interpreters connect the figurines with goddesses, popular religion, and females but. The hole in the whole interpretation of the figurines being part of the “Asherah pole” is the connection between Asherah and the Judean figurines.

One cannot say if the figurines are meant to represent Asherah or not. Hestrin compares the themes of the figurines to representations of Asherah. Judean Pillar Figurines regularly appear in discussions about Israelite religion, monotheism, and female practice.

Erin Darby uses Near Eastern texts, iconography, the Hebrew Bible, and the archaeology of Jerusalem to explore figurine function, the gender of figurine users, and the relationship between Judean figurines and the Assyrian Empire.

Asherah figurines. (ninapaley) Differences Between Book and Folk Religion. At this point it is important to make a distinction between the book religion of the ruling classes in the metropolis and folk or popular religion as it was practiced in rural communities for which most Israelites were a : Anya Leonard.

Israeli archeologist Dr. Aaron Greener asks “what are clay female figurines doing in Judah during the biblical period?” My non-archeologist answer is; they represent kosher (suitable for religious Jews) El Shaddai (god of breasts, a pre-Sinai name for God) and Shekinah (a feminine concept) of the Divine Asexual One of Israel.

An Asherah pole is a sacred tree or pole that stood near Canaanite religious locations to honor the Ugaritic mother goddess Asherah, consort of El. The relation of the literary references to an asherah and archaeological finds of Judaean pillar-figurines has engendered a literature of debate.

The asherim were also cult objects related to the worship of Asherah, the consort of either Ba'al or, as. The Judean Pillar-Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah The Social Functions and Ritual Significance of Jewelry in the Iron Age II Southern Levant Jan Author: Beth Alpert Nakhai.

An Asherah pole is a sacred tree or pole that stood near Canaanite religious locations to honor the Ugaritic mother-goddess Asherah, consort of El. [1] The relation of the literary references to an asherah and archaeological finds of Judaean pillar-figurines has engendered a literature of debate.

[2]The asherim were also cult objects related to the worship of the fertility Goddess Asherah, the. An Asherah pole is a sacred tree or pole that stood near Canaanite religious locations to honor the Ugaritic mother-goddess Asherah, consort of El. The relation of the literary references to an Asherah and archaeological finds of Judaean pillar-figurines has engendered much debate.

Judean pillar figurines are one of the most common ritual objects from Iron II Israel. These small terracotta females have received a great deal of scholarly attention, appearing in discussions about Israelite religion, monotheism, and women's practice.

Yet the figurines are still poorly by: 4. The links between archaeology and the Bible have fascinated generation of archaeologists and biblical scholars who seek evidence to support events described in the Bible. The British Museum's collections include a wealth of incised objects, scripts, and pictorial reliefs that provide just such evidence.

For this important book, the author has selected seventy-two such "documents," mainly from /5(2). From books like The Judean Pillar Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah, to the New World Figurine Project, there are countless different affordable books on this topic here. Buy cheap figurines textbooks today and discover the secrets of various collections and what the individual figures are worth.

R. Kletter, “Between Archaeology and Theology- The Pillar Figurines from Judah and the Asherah” pp. in A. Mazar ed. Studies in the Archaeology of the Iron Age in Israel and Jordan. JSOTSupp Sheffield Academic, ; R. Byrne, “Lie Back and Think of Judah- The Reproductive Politics of Pillar Figurines” NEA () 6 The Judean Pillar-Figurines and the Archaeology of Asherah (Oxford: Tempus Reparatum, ).

Summary in a paper: ‘Between Archaeology and Theology: The Pillar Figurines from Judah and the Asherah’, in A. Mazar, ed., Studies in the Archaeology of the Iron Age in Israel and Jordan (JSOTSupSheffield: SAP, ), – This Late Bronze Age figurine found at Tel Rehov may have been used in Canaanite worship, according to Dr.

Amihai Mazar. Photo: Clara Amit, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority. The Canaanite and Israelite site of Tel Rehov is the largest mound in the Beth. The relation of the literary references to an asherah and archaeological finds of Judaean pillar-figurines has engendered a literature of debate.

[9] The asherim were also cult objects related to the worship of the fertility goddess Asherah, the consort of either Ba'al or, as inscriptions from Kuntillet ‘Ajrud and Khirbet el-Qom attest, Yahweh, [10] and thus objects of contention among competing cults.

This article examines the much-debated Judean pillar figurines (JPFs), which date to the late Iron Age in the Levant and appear to be uniquely Judean artifacts. Scholarly discussion of JPFs, which has spanned a century, focuses primarily on questions of representation and use, and has contributed to the ongoing debate over the role of Asherah Cited by: 7.

For centuries scholars have puzzled over the problem of Old Testament chronology. One of the most difficult issues has been the synchronization of the reign of the Hebrew kings. The biblical records provide much information about these kings and how they relate to each other. But when all the information is put together it seems contradictory, as early as the third century B.C.

attempts were 4/5(3).Get this from a library! Interpreting Judean pillar figurines: gender and empire in Judean apotropaic ritual. [Erin Darby] -- Judean pillar figurines are one of the most common ritual objects from Iron II Israel.

These small terracotta females have received a great deal of .Judean Pillar Figurines Here is a picture of two styles of figurines from the Biblical Archaeology Society.

Posted by Charles Savelle at PM. Labels: Backgrounds, Biblical Archaeology. The St Albans Benefactors' Book: precious gifts and colourful characters 1 day ago Study Hacks.